Davis Garden Show

Nursery pro Don Shor has been gardening and selling plants in Davis for more than three decades. Join Don and co-host Lois Richter as they discuss and answer your questions on all things for the garden. To submit a question (or a brag!) send to gmail.com for DavisGardenShow.

Replays Saturday 9-10am
Live Thursday 12-1pm
Podcast
Music programs are only online for two weeks after they are broadcast.

Davis Garden Show, Oct. 14, 2021 -- Leafy greens, lawns to meadows, weed management

This is the time to plant those leafy greens to eat all winter long. Other winter vegetables include brassicas and root crops like carrots. You can plant in the ground, or in a barrel by the back door, but not INSIDE -- veggies are not grown as houseplants because they need more light. Could you build a greenhouse inside? Well, yes, but it requires grow lights and structures and ...  It's just so much easier if you can grow them outside instead.

Lois asks "Suppose I fill that barrel out back with leafy greens. Do squirrels and rats like salad?"  Well, yes; but it's not hard to make a cover to keep them out.

Is this the time to re-seed one's lawn? (Assuming one still HAS a lawn!) Well, first let's hear Don talk on deciding how much grass you want/need in your situation.  Then, yes; this is a good time to be re-seeding, over-seeding,  planting, or turning your lawn into a meadow. 

The final segment today is about managing weeds. Managing them? Don't you mean removing them? Well, yes; but removal is most easily done at different times for different weed species. It's the usual case of "know your enemy" when planning your strategy. This show will help!

And October is our final tomato harvest and processing time. (Imagine Don's kitchen counters covered with tomatoes!)

Do we take anyone's questions? Well, yes; if you send one in to DavisGardenShow@gmail.com, it might be used on the air. It will at least be read and replied to.

Davis Garden Show, Sept. 30, 2021 -- Winter flowers and bulbs

Things to plant in October, November ...

  • Leafy greens -- lettuce, kale, NOT basil -- continue to plant all winter.
  • Brassicas (where we eat the buds or heads) get planted earlier than  leafy greens (where we trim the leaves but the plant continues to grow).
  • Bulbs -- plant most bulbs now, some later. "Full sun" in winter can be under a deciduous tree, which shades that spot in the summer. PERFECT for many bulbs.
  • Winter flowers -- cheery annual flowers to plant now.
  • Perennials with winter blooms -- plant anytime, they last for years!  -- Camellias, Euryops, Gazania, Hellebore, Hardenbergia, etcetera.

Davis Garden Show, Sept. 23, 2021 -- Leucadendrons

Do native bees, pollinators, and other beneficials NEED to have only NATIVE plants? No, for most. But yes for a few. The "Pipevine Swallowtail" butterfly needs the California pipevine for its larva to feed on (other pipevine species won't do). Monarch butterfly larva feed only on milkweed plants. But most local insects will be happy with many garden plants. Having a diversity of plant species is a good way to attract and help beneficial insects.

What is "planting with natives?" If "native" means "originally existing in the local plant community," then we are extremely limited in Davis. If "native" means "native somewhere" (that is, it's not a hybrid), then anything goes! If "native" means "naturally occuring in some political region" such as California, then native-ness has no relationship to how well something will grow in my yard -- because California contains so many different climate zones. Perhaps it would be better to look for "locally adapted" plants -- species which originated in climates like ours (such as the Mediterranean, coastal Chile, parts of Australia, southern Africa, etc.), and so will grow well in OUR climate.

Today's questions include: Should we be "pinching" broccoli? (Don doesn't.) That's bacterial Citrus Blast -- exacerbated by a few days of humid weather in August. Why Don's 32-year-old orchard is being taken out (lifespan of the trees vs. changing economics vs. climate expectations).  How farmers decide what to plant where. And what some people expect to happen to our local climate in the next 20-50 years.

Davis Garden Show, Sept. 16, 2021, Brassicas -- a one-plant wonder

'Tis a time of CHANGE!  Weather is cooler, season is later ... For some folks, it's time to cut down the cucumber vines and plant some brassicas. For others (like Don), there are still tomatoes ripening to harvest into October. What's your plan for a winter garden? Now is a good time to plant peas, lettuce, brassicas, and other cool seaon vegetablees.  You can also plan to put "cover crops" on the portion of your summer garden that you don't plan to plant for the winter -- to keep down weeds and improve your soil.

Davis Garden Show, Sept. 9, 2021, Houseplants and water

Today's topics:

  • Tomato problems this year
  • Water needed for growing food is more than water needed to just grow foliage
  • Almond trees
  • Nematodes -- what are they and what to do if you have them
  • House plants that are, and are not, easy to grow
  • Don recommends for new gardeners: Golden pothos (and relatives), Easy ZZ, and Snakeplant (Sanserveria)
  • Growing trees indoors
  • Ficus benjamina  = flexible about lighting, but fussy when you move it.
  • Is it too late to plant tomatos? Pepper? Pumpkins? YES, those get planted in the spring to be HARVESTED in the fall.
  • Now is the time to start planning (and planting) your winter garden! (More details next show.)

Davis Garden Show, Sept. 2, 2021, butterflies and hanging baskets

Many, many questions this time!  (Some carried over to the next show.)

Gardening for butterflies,

hanging baskets for coastal zones,

time to plant brassicas (cabbage-family) and a winter garden,

persimmon trees struggling to establish,

tomatoes that didn't do well,  and more.

To send in questions, brags, comments, or commendations; write to Don Shor and Lois Richter at  DavisGardenShow@gmail.com

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Comments

I just discovered you as a replacement for the now-defunct Farmer Fred radio show. I listen to the podcast. It's extremely useful to have timely and local garden coverage again. Thanks! John, Fair Oaks, March 2021

Don and Lois,

Hi! I am back! I was recently given a little beet seedling along with a strawberry plant that I had bought at a yard sale. Before I go on, I want to let you know that this woman did a great job taking care of her plants and the ones she was selling also looked great. However, I forgot to ask her how to take care of the beets. I have never grown them before. Anything you can tell me that I should know about beets? I also would like to know how long these plants can live. I want them to do well. I may not harvest them, but instead enjoy the pretty plants that they are. I am, however harvesting the strawberries.

-Robin in Southern California

Don and Lois,

Hi! This might be unusual to ask, but can you tell me how to take care of Hulda Klager Lilacs here in Southern California? I had requested some from the author of a book I read. This author wrote about Hulda Kalger and all she went through in her life and to hybridize plants, especially lilacs. I have two small ones that the author shipped me through the mail along with some seeds. The plants will be possibly the creamy white blooming ones and the seeds pink blooming ones. I have the plants in a nice plastic pot of miracle grow infused potting soil. They are located in part sun and part shade. Anything you can tell me would be so helpful because I want to keep these plants alive. They have great meaning to me.

Thank you so much and it is great to ask you another question.

-Robin in Southern California

just wanted to say that Don has been excellent fill-in host and guest for Farmer Fred lately. Esp good was when he and Debbie Flower hosted together but he needed to let Debbie talk a little more. Have not heard the 1 hour show yhet on this Davis station but will start listening now. Its difficult to remember about a Thursday show but i see there's a Saturday rebroadcast, which is great because there is now almost a solid block of gardening shows to listen to on Saturday from 9 AM to 2 PM. Too bad this Davis radio station seems to be a little left of center and anti-business though from what i can see at first glance. Maybe Don can take over FF's show if/when he ever retires.

Don and Lois,

Hi! Miss me? I know I have not written in awhile, but I have been busy. But not too busy to really work on our new back yard garden. And not too busy to listen to the podcasts of your show. I know that tomatos are very popular lately, but do you have any advice on strawberries, such as how much water do strawberries need? Also, how do I keep my cat grass lasting a long time. The lady at the pet shop I bought the cat grass at said that it should last me a long time, but my last pot of cat grass died after about 2 months. It had been slightly chewed on by my neighbors' cat whom I bought it for in the first place. Would this shorten the grasses life expectancy? Your advice, as always, is welcome. Our back yard is turning out beautiful (with some help from Eric and my daughter.)

Looking forward to your next podcast and many more,
Robin in Southern California

What can you do about nutsedge?

HELP

Lois and Don are the BOMB! This is my favorite radio show!

I'm in Sacramento and found this show on Itunes podcasts. I started listening to the DGS podcasts and now I have to listen every week LIVE during lunch hour. It has helped me with my gardening. Because the Sacramento valley is so full of microclimates, there really no replacement for this show for us gardeners here. And the hosts are so delightful and interesting to listen to. I wish Don and Lois would write a book about gardening here! I would buy it! Keep up the good work KDRT!

YAY, Davis Garden Show!!!

What a nice note! Thanks so much for posting it, and thanks for listening!

Don and Lois,

Hi! Thank you so much for answering my African Violet pot question. Your answer was very helpful when I chose a special pot for the varigated African Violet leaf that I had rooted. It looks so cute in the pot with the resievor and wick.

As for my next question, Eric suggested that I ask you if it is ok to prune some plants and trees in wet weather. I do not mean a deluge, but either after a rain storm, between rainstorms, or during a light rain. I do some of my weeding during this weather because the weeds pull up easier, though they do stick to my hands which is not fun.

Thank you for answering my past questions. My ears always perk up when I hear mine and Eric's questions/comments on your show. Very exciting for us both. That is partly why I listen to your podcast first in my lineup of gardening podcasts to listen and watch. The other reason is that your show has the most useful gardening information.

Robin in Southern California

I think it depends upon the species. Some of our California native shrubs (like Ceanothus and Redbud) should NOT be pruned when the cut might get wet. (That's whether in the winter OR in the summer just before the sprinklers come on.) But lots of fruit trees are regularly pruned in winter and then get rained on. I'll ask Don to explain more on our show next week.  -- Lois

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