Chambers Street Theatre

Live Thursday 11-11:30am
Replays Wednesday 11-11:30am, Sunday 10-10:30am

DJ(s): 

Hear amazing stories from the Golden State, from way back when in the language from way back when, with some stories written by the reader herself! Sit back and enjoy.

Podcast

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on May 21st, 2015

Mark Twain was a reader so he knew all about balloon trips and detective stories.  Twain used the balloon trip idea in "Tom Sawyer Abroad," and off Tom, Jim, and Huck go up in the air.  As usual, Twain makes a few side trips, and today Ruth reads the opening of Chapter 1 telling the travlin' story of Postmaster Nat Parsons.  Nat goes to Washington to see the President about a letter to someone unknown with postage due.

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on May 14th, 2015

Today Ruth reads from Mark Twain's "Roughing It,"  Chapter 22.  This is the Tahoe chapter when Twain was going to go into the lumber business, but didn't do a very good job of it.  After the Twain reading, Ruth talks about her experiences hiking in the same area with some safety tips recommended by the Sierra Club.  Be sure to take a whistle, is one tip. Tune in for more.

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on May 7th, 2015

For those of you munchin' on a Kale and Steak dish covered in grilled Onions...this show is for you.  First we have from Mark Twain's "Roughing It," in Chapter 5 the mouth watering tale of a Coyote's diet.  This is followed by part of Chapter 4 that tells of the Stage Coach rider's fest at a Stage Stop.  Ahh, those were the days!

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on Apr 30th, 2015

Today Ruth reads from "Innocents Abroad."  Yes, it's Mark Twain... This is straight reporter writing, and we can all learn from the lively way Twain tells about facts, places, and people.  Even information can be interesting and Twain proves it.  Read Chapter 14 about the Cathedral of Nortre Dame and the Paris Morgue to for alive and insightful writing.

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on Apr 23rd, 2015

And here we are with the Twain version of the "Duel."  Last week we did the Dickens' "Duel."  It's up to you to compare Dickens and Twain.  I delight in the similaries and the differences:  Dickens, the Englishman, goes for the lighter "picking away" style, while Twain gets out the "axes."  Both go after the need for this Dueling to stop, and it's humor that finds the "feet of clay."

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on Apr 16th, 2015

We can all look back and say "Dueling was silly."  Well, it wasn't so silly in the 1800's.  This was serious and deadly business.  Many men were tricked into losing their lives, and many men were mutilated.  This strange duel business had to be attacked with humor.  Charles Dickens was one of the first writers to challenge the "honor" of death.  

And it was Mark Twain who answered the call on the American side.  Often it has been said that Twain imitated Dickens.  Twain said he learned a great deal from Dickens.  Compare this week's Dickens' "Duel" with next week's "Duel" by Twain.  Very different, yet going for the same problem. 

 

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on Apr 9th, 2015

Once again we go to Mark Twain for good reporting in "Roughing It."  Chapter LXX covers meeting with a man who had a mental issue.  I'll leave it at that, because only Mark Twain could cover this story with truth, compassion, and humor.  Not much was known about mental issues in the 1800's so Twain used his reporter skills to record the reality that could be figured out in the future.

Chambers Street Theatre for 11am on Mar 26th, 2015

Not only were there good writers in the 1800's, but also today.  Dave Jones is living now and writing about the "Cowboy."  We open the show with Dave's childhood memories, then move on to Robert  W. Service who is always so special.  It's a great day for the poets of popular culture.

Pages

Subscribe to Chambers Street Theatre Archives

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <blockquote> <br> <cite> <code> <dd> <div> <dl> <dt> <em> <img> <li> <ol> <p> <span> <strong> <ul>
    Allowed Style properties: float, height, left, right, width

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • You may post PHP code. You should include <?php ?> tags.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.